Technology & Licensing Opportunities

The following technologies are available for both non-exclusive and exclusive licenses.  Companies that are interested in licensing a NOAA product may contact the NOAA Technology Partnerships Office via our office email at NOAA.t2@noaa.gov. Please make sure to reference the specific technology in which you are interested in the text of your email.  Interested companies will be asked to complete a licensing questionnaire which will detail their suitability as a licensing partner and the specific marketing strategy for the technology.  Please note that requests for exclusive licenses will require license initiation fees and will require a public comment period of at least 30 days prior to implementation.  
Sub-Surface Automated Dual Water Sampler (SAS)
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Sub-Surface Automated Dual Water Sampler (SAS)

NOAA-Designed Hands On Learning Tool for Students and Scientists

The sub-surface automated dual water sampler (SAS) was designed by researchers at NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) and the University of Miami to help scientists study water chemistry on shallow reef habitats. Explore the SAS website, use it to guide you in building and using your own water samplers, embrace the maker movement and improve on our design. If you are a teacher, there are free lesson plans to download that include labs and activities related to science, technology, and engineering. Enjoy this site and please use the SAS to learn about and explore our oceans!
NOAA-Funded Coral Instrument Leads to Start-Up
Friday, December 22, 2017

NOAA-Funded Coral Instrument Leads to Start-Up

CISME Instruments, LLC to Sell Commercial Instrument for Coral and Benthic Studies

CISME was developed by Drs. Alina M. Szmant and Robert F. Whitehead at the University of North Carolina Wilmington Center for Marine Science with funding from NOAA OER Grant NA09OAR4320073. The team is in the process of commercializing the Coral In Situ Metabolism INstrument or CISME (pronounced Kiss-Me). The start up has a set of instruments available for testing by trained and qualified research divers who are willing to collaborate and provide the company their feedback. A few “early adopter” units are also available for sale.
Novel, Inexpensive Temperature Sensor Unlocks Coral Monitoring Challenge
Thursday, March 23, 2017

Novel, Inexpensive Temperature Sensor Unlocks Coral Monitoring Challenge

Novel design and minimal cost propel interest in global deployment at reefs.

Warm ocean water can be a killer for coral reefs, and AOML recently developed a new inexpensive sensor to drastically improve our ability to measure and monitor changing temperatures on reefs at an unprecedented scale.  The low cost sea temperature sensor, known as InSituSea, costs roughly $10 in parts to produce while providing high accuracy (0.05-0.1 C) in measurement. With a production cost that is 10% of an off-the-shelf temperature sensor, colleagues have expressed strong interest in deploying the InSituSea sea temperature sensor at coral reefs around the world.  
Man Overboard Recovery Device
Monday, March 6, 2017

Man Overboard Recovery Device

Seeking U.S. Manufacturer for NOAA device that allows assisted rescue of incapacitated crew

The NOAA Man Overboard Device allows a single rescuer to attach a lifting harness to an unresponsive victim who is unable to assist in their own rescue.  NOAA device does not require the rescuer to enter the water to assist the victim, which is critical in situations where the water is too cold and/or the operator of the boat is required to make the rescue. 
Deepwater Lionfish Trap
Monday, March 6, 2017

Deepwater Lionfish Trap

Designs for Two New Deepwater Traps Released

NOAA scientists have developed two new trap designs that can target invasive lionfish in deep water and reduce negative effects on native species that are ecologically, recreationally, or commercially important. 
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Our mission is to foster preeminent science and technological innovation through federal investments in research and development (R&D), partnerships or licensing opportunities at NOAA.