Technology & Licensing Opportunities

The following technologies are available for both non-exclusive and exclusive licenses.  Companies that are interested in licensing a NOAA product may contact the NOAA Technology Partnerships Office via our office email at NOAA.t2@noaa.gov. Please make sure to reference the specific technology in which you are interested in the text of your email.  Interested companies will be asked to complete a licensing questionnaire which will detail their suitability as a licensing partner and the specific marketing strategy for the technology.  Please note that requests for exclusive licenses will require license initiation fees and will require a public comment period of at least 30 days prior to implementation.  
NOAA's Expendable BathyThermograph (XBT) - Innovation for Taking the Ocean's Temperature
Friday, December 22, 2017

NOAA's Expendable BathyThermograph (XBT) - Innovation for Taking the Ocean's Temperature

An eXpendable BathyThermograph (XBT) is a probe that is dropped from a ship and measures the temperature as it falls through the water. A very thin wire transmits the temperature data to the ship where it is recorded for later analysis. The probe is designed to fall at a known rate, so that the depth of the probe can be inferred from the time since it was launched.
NOAA-Funded Coral Instrument Leads to Start-Up
Friday, December 22, 2017

NOAA-Funded Coral Instrument Leads to Start-Up

CISME Instruments, LLC to Sell Commercial Instrument for Coral and Benthic Studies

CISME was developed by Drs. Alina M. Szmant and Robert F. Whitehead at the University of North Carolina Wilmington Center for Marine Science with funding from NOAA OER Grant NA09OAR4320073. The team is in the process of commercializing the Coral In Situ Metabolism INstrument or CISME (pronounced Kiss-Me). The start up has a set of instruments available for testing by trained and qualified research divers who are willing to collaborate and provide the company their feedback. A few “early adopter” units are also available for sale.
Man Overboard Recovery Device (U.S. Patent Pending)
Monday, March 6, 2017

Man Overboard Recovery Device (U.S. Patent Pending)

NOAA device allows assisted rescue of incapacitated crew

The NOAA Man Overboard Device allows a single rescuer to attach a lifting harness to an unresponsive victim who is unable to assist in their own rescue.  That is the most significant advantage that our device has over existing rescue devices. Our device does not require the rescuer to enter the water to assist the victim. I feel that any vessel equipped with both a Life Sling and our device can recover an MOB in almost any situation. 

Deepwater Lionfish Trap (U.S. Patent Pending)
Monday, March 6, 2017

Deepwater Lionfish Trap (U.S. Patent Pending)

Designs for Two New Deepwater Traps Released

NOAA scientists have developed two new trap designs that can target invasive lionfish in deep water and reduce negative effects on native species that are ecologically, recreationally, or commercially important. 
ONav and GeoPixel™: Web-Based Navigation for the Collection of Aerial Imagery (U.S. Patent Pending)
Wednesday, October 26, 2016

ONav and GeoPixel™: Web-Based Navigation for the Collection of Aerial Imagery (U.S. Patent Pending)

Seeking commercial partners for licensing and distribution of this NOAA-developed technology.

NOAA engineers have created a heads-up navigation display for pilots for coastal imagery acquisition, “ONav.”  The system combines a real-time Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) stream along with image collection metadata from the on-board cameras to generate vector overlays the pilots can use to easily navigate, track progress, and ensure full coverage of the survey area greatly improving survey efficiency.
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Our mission is to foster preeminent science and technological innovation through federal investments in research and development (R&D), partnerships or licensing opportunities at NOAA.