NOAA Technology Transfer Successes

NOAA technology used to research deep-sea volcanic and hydrothermal activity

NOAA technology used to research deep-sea volcanic and hydrothermal activity

As part of the ongoing Tonga Eruption Seabed Mapping Project, a team of scientists conducted a deep-water survey to better understand the impacts of the January 2022 Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcanic eruption on the ocean environment. The research team used a technology developed by NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Lab (PMEL) to determine the level of ongoing volcanic and hydrothermal activity within the post-eruption caldera. The Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorder (MAPR) instruments made it possible for scientists to capture direct measurements of the water column up to 300 meters deep. This is the first time that such a survey has been conducted entirely remotely, using an uncrewed surface vessel that was operated and monitored by engineers and scientists…
Eruption highlights how NOAA technological innovation powers public safety, economic development, and scientific discovery

Eruption highlights how NOAA technological innovation powers public safety, economic development, and scientific discovery

When a volcano in the South Pacific Ocean erupted in January 2022, NOAA researchers were well-equipped to study the multi-hazard event by sky and by sea. Key technologies and strategic partnerships made it possible for NOAA to issue warnings that saved lives around the world, while also collecting scientific data that will improve forecasting models and disaster response for future events.
NOAA’s Cooperative R&D Agreements – Supporting Partnerships with the U.S. Private Weather Industry

NOAA’s Cooperative R&D Agreements – Supporting Partnerships with the U.S. Private Weather Industry

NOAA’s laboratories regularly partner with private sector companies through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements – CRADAs – to conduct work that is mutually beneficial and helps to accomplish the NOAA mission. One area of increasing collaborative activity is in private weather forecasting. A recent article in Grist.org provides a good description of how NOAA’s weather forecasting work overlaps with private industry and how they complement each other. Read the original article: As private weather forecasting takes off, who is left behind?
NOAA Awarded U.S. Patent for Innovative Lionfish Trap

NOAA Awarded U.S. Patent for Innovative Lionfish Trap

Story originally published in April, 2021. Device could help protect threatened ecosystems and aid fishing communities The Challenge Over the last 20 years, invasive lionfish populations have dramatically increased throughout the western Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea. Lionfish have already caused a decline in native species that have significant ecological, cultural, and commercial value. Further impacts on coral reefs and other important ecosystems are anticipated, but not yet fully understood. Fortunately, as the threat of lionfish has intensified, so too have the levels of awareness and concern among not just scientists and fishers, but among members of…
Public-private research partnerships are fueling NOAA innovation

Public-private research partnerships are fueling NOAA innovation

A record number of NOAA Cooperative Research and Development Agreements in 2021 has generated scientific and economic benefits Research partnerships are increasingly important as scientists work to address complex global problems like coastal resilience, food security, and climate change. Public-private partnerships, in particular, are vital for bringing private sector innovation and agility into NOAA’s research and development efforts. One of the key tools in NOAA’s partnership toolkit is the CRADA, or Cooperative Research and Development Agreement.  A CRADA is a formal agreement that allows federal and non-federal partners to do collaborative research and further develop new science into commercially-available products. CRADAs connect NOAA…
Small Company Thrives on Commercialization of NOAA’s Miniaturized Particle Spectrometer

Small Company Thrives on Commercialization of NOAA’s Miniaturized Particle Spectrometer

POPS is a low-cost, high-sensitivity alternative to traditional aerosol measurement technologies. Story written by Miguel Aristu For many people, hiking is a peaceful escape from everyday stressors. For Dr. Ping Chen, CEO of Handix Scientific Inc., hiking was a starting point of his success. In 2015, he met NOAA inventor and research physicist, Dr. Ru-Shan Gao, on a trail in Boulder, Colorado. As they walked, Gao proudly spoke about NOAA’s recently-developed Portable Optical Particle Spectrometer (POPS) for aerosol measurement. Chen immediately realized the technology’s tremendous potential and expressed interest in licensing and commercializing the technology with a firm belief that POPS…