NOAA Technology Marketplace

Open Source Technologies

The goal of NOAA’s Technology Transfer and SBIR Programs is to maximize the benefit of the taxpayer investment in the research and development activities at NOAA by encouraging the broadest use possible of any technology that is developed.  NOAA seeks to make as much technology available at low or no cost to encourage broad use. The following technologies are available royalty free under a variety of Open Source or Public Domain designations. 

Please contact us at NOAA.T2@noaa.gov if you have any questions about using these technologies.

Wireless Open Water Logger for Ocean Sampling

Wireless Open Water Logger for Ocean Sampling

The Wireless Open Water Logger (WOWL) Project is a NOAA-funded effort by Creare LLC, in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center. The goal is to enable large-scale opportunistic ocean sampling by developing a low-cost, reliable, and open-source ocean temperature and depth logger. Changes in ocean temperature have a profound impact on the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture. Sampling offshore ocean temperatures, particularly at depth, is challenging and expensive. Opportunistic sampling from fishing gear can address this sampling need. Commercial fishermen are more and more aware of the correlations between water temperature and harvest. Existing programs,…
Sub-Surface Automated Dual Water Sampler (SAS)

Sub-Surface Automated Dual Water Sampler (SAS)

Sub-Surface Automated Dual Water Sampler (SAS) Designed by researchers at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) and the University of Miami to help scientists study water chemistry on shallow reef habitats. Explore the SAS website, use it to guide you in building and using your own water samplers, embrace the maker movement and improve on our design. If you are a teacher, there are free lesson plans to download that include labs and activities related to science, technology, and engineering.  Check out the NOAA SAS website and please use the SAS to learn about and explore our oceans!
Opuhala Sea Temperature Sensor

Opuhala Sea Temperature Sensor

Opuhala was the ancient Hawaiian goddess of corals and spiny creatures. We have chosen this name to represent our project to study the influence of fluctuating sea temperatures on the growth and health of corals around the world, and also to compare the in situ data with satellite-measured data in an effort to improve satellite algorithms. Three different types of coral reefs, fringing, barrier, and atolls will be monitored at 5m, 10m and 15m depth, where appropriate. The sea temperature sensor developed for the Opuhala project has been developed with low cost in mind because of the many sites that…
NOAA Awarded U.S. Patent for Innovative Lionfish Trap

NOAA Awarded U.S. Patent for Innovative Lionfish Trap

Device could help protect threatened ecosystems and aid fishing communities The Challenge Over the last 20 years, invasive lionfish populations have dramatically increased throughout the western Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea. Lionfish have already caused a decline in native species that have significant ecological, cultural, and commercial value. Further impacts on coral reefs and other important ecosystems are anticipated, but not yet fully understood. Fortunately, as the threat of lionfish has intensified, so too have the levels of awareness and concern among not just scientists and fishers, but among members of the public. In recent years, state-sponsored…
Clean Harvest Cable Grid

Clean Harvest Cable Grid

The NOAA patented Clean Harvest Cable Grid (US Patent 10,966,415 B2) allows marine mammals, including sea turtles and other large marine animals, to escape from large fish trawls with minimal impact to normal fishing operations or target catch retention. The Type I (TI) shown above was designed to work in high profile fish trawls. NOAA has patented this technology and is making it available under an Open Source license to ensure designs are compliant and do not harm sea turtles or other marine mammals. For more information, please contact Nick Hopkins at NOAA’s Southeast Fisheries Science Center.